Community Based Approach to Fisheries Management

Community Based Approaches to Fisheries Management (CBFM)

Inshore fisheries are critical to Pacific island communities for food, income and employment. However, fast-growing populations, poorly managed fishing effort, and overfishing are driving unsustainable pressures on many inshore fisheries. Our research aims to strengthen and scale-out community-based approaches to fisheries management (CBFM), focusing on the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Kiribati. Our projects balance research with development, providing research outputs with development outcomes. Through empowering communities, and facilitating better local and national governance of near-shore fisheries, our projects will strengthen the resilience of coastal communities and enable the long term development of sustainable and secure fisheries. Research includes assessment of critical success factors of implementing CBFM, how CBFM interacts with broader livelihood choices, and how men and women make decisions around CBFM. We also study how the successes from work done in communities and with national agencies in the three partner countries could be spread through the region.

For example, in the small island developing State of Kiribati, researchers from the University of Wollongong work with island communities and collaborate closely with the Government of Kiribati, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community and the Worldfish Centre to strengthen capacity and empower these communities to manage and develop their fisheries sustainably. Research includes assessment of critical success factors of implementing CBFM, how CBFM interacts with broader livelihood choices, and how men and women make decisions around CBFM. We also look at how the successes from work done in communities and with national agencies in the three partner countries be spread through the region. Outputs will focus on communications, including policy documents, training material, management plans, and workshops. Helping to facilitate better local and national governance of near-shore fisheries will lead to a sustainable and secure supply of fish for the region.

For further information, please contact Dr Quentin Hanich.

CFBM Image 2

CFBM Image 2

Last reviewed: 1 July, 2015